FIRE SAFETY STANDARDS IN LET PROPERTIES

FIRE SAFETY STANDARDS IN LET PROPERTIES2018-07-31T15:02:16+00:00

FIRE SAFETY IN LET PROPERTIES

WHAT ARE COMMON RECOMMENDATIONS FOLLOWING A FIRE RISK ASSESSMENT?

It is difficult to give exact examples of what a let property might require in terms of fire safety as it depends on a number of intersecting factors. For instance, the layout of the property, the number of tenants, the storeys in the property and existing fire safety equipment will all impact what the Fire Officer might recommend.

Some basic fire safety standards for residential property include the following:

Automatic Fire Detection Systems

Often simply called fire alarms, these are mains wired, interlinked systems and are a minimum standard under the LACORS guidelines. They are usually a combination of fire and heat detectors. Read more about Automatic Fire Detection and Alarm systems.

Fire doors

A Fire Risk Assessment will identify whether or not these are required in your property. Their evaluation will depend on the layout of the property, how complex the escape route is and the risk level identified. Read more about Fire doors.

Fire extinguishers and blankets

Fire extinguishers and blankets can be essential in restricting the development and spread of small fires in their early stages. The LACORS guidelines recommend fire blankets in all rented properties and fire extinguishers in most. Fire extinguishers and fire blankets should be installed by a competent person with 3rd party accreditation. (e.g. BAFE or FIRAS)

Changes in layout

A part of the fire officers job is to evaluate how each tenant will escape in the case of a fire. If accomodation units are poorly laid out, an occupant may not be able to reach an escape route in time to leave safely. Ideally bedrooms should be closer to the exit door than the kitchen or living room.

Further certification

Depending on the level of risk identified by the Fire Officer they may recommend further certification. This may include an EICR, EPC, PAT testing, Gas Safety Certificates, Fire Stopping Surveys, and Emergency Lighting Certificates.

Changes to locks on doors

Final exit doors from Houses in Multiple Occupation must be able to be opened from inside by a single “thumb turn” action. Multiple key locks on external doors is incredibly dangerous in a fire situation where smoke and heat make it difficult to get out, especially in shared accommodation. This risk is heightened  further where there are multiple flats sharing one exit door.

Fire Safety Log Book and Fire Action Notices

A log book is required in HMOs to record compulsory checks of the alarm system, as well as any false alarms. The council may ask to see your log book at any time during their inspections. 2006 HMO management regulations state that HMOs require a fire action notice and the property manager’s emergency contact details on display in the property.

FURTHER QUESTIONS?

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